Managing Identified Wildlife:
Procedures and Measures

Volume 1
February 1999

Table of contents

Mammals

Pacific water shrew (Sorex bendirii)

WHA planning objectives

Protect current and historical habitat. Historical habitat is habitat where the species was once known to occur but at which there has been no verified sighting in the last 20 years.

Maintain microclimatic condition within occupied riparian area.

Wildlife habitat area

Establish WHAs along occupied watercourses and at historical sites in high capability or high suitability habitat. WHAs should extend the entire length of the stream reach and contain a 30 m core area and a 45 m buffer on each side of the stream.

GWM management objectives

Maintain the physical integrity of the riparian area around occupied streams.

Maintain or create the microclimate and old forest structural elements within riparian areas.

General wildlife measures

These measures must be applied within a WHA approved for the species.

Access

  • Do not construct roads through the WHA unless the district manager and regional fish and wildlife manager are satisifed there is no other practicable option and the variance is approved by the district manager and regional fish and wildlife manager.

Recreation

  • Do not establish recreational trails or sites.

Silviculture

  • Do not harvest or salvage in core area.
  • Use partial harvesting systems in the buffer that maintain 80% basal area unless variance is approved by the district manager and regional fish and wildlife manager. Partial harvest should be oriented towards the creation of old forest characteristics such as large diameter trees, multilayered canopies, snags and coarse woody debris.
  • Restrict activities that may alter the vegetation, hydrology, stream structure or soils, particularly the upper soil layers.

Management considerations (not mandatory)

Consider the following during operational planning:

Landscape unit planning considerations (not mandatory)

Due to the high degree of fragmentation within the range of this species, forest habitat along watercourses and wetlands should be restored to connect populations. These linkage requirements should be considered during landscape unit planning.

Cross references

Rubber boa, American bittern, Keen's long-eared myotis, mountain beaver


Keen's long-eared myotis (Myotis keenii)

WHA planning objectives

Protect known hibernacula, maternity colonies and roosting sites, and adjacent foraging areas and movement corridors.

Wildlife habitat area

Establish a WHA around hibernacula, maternity colonies and roosting sites. The WHA will include a 100 m radius core area and a 200 m buffer. It also includes a minimum 20 m on either side of any stream, wetland or lake within 500 m of the occurrence. This riparian area should be treated as a core area.

GWM management objectives

Maintain microclimate conditions of the colony site.

Minimize disturbance to colonies.

Maintain forage opportunities and night roosting habitat near colonies.

General wildlife measures

These measures must be applied within a WHA approved for the species.

Access

  • No road construction should be carried out within the core area unless the district manager and regional fish and wildlife manager are satisifed there is no other practicable option and the variance is approved by the district manager and regional fish and wildlife manager.
  • Do not remove rock or talus.

Silviculture

  • Do not harvest or salvage in core area.
  • Harvesting within the buffer is subject to timing constraints. For maternity colonies, harvesting should not be carried out from June to July. Around hibernacula, harvesting beyond the core area may need to be limited during select winter months. Consult MELP for specific timing information.
  • Use partial harvesting systems in the buffer that maintain 80% basal area unless variance is approved by the district manager and regional fish and wildlife manager.
  • Retain a selection of stand structural elements, such as large green trees, snags, logs on the forest floor, and canopy gaps. Older green trees should have structural characteristics such as cracks and crevices in thick bark, bark pulling away from the trunk forming crevices, and holes in the bole where limbs have been shed. Snags should have cracks, peeling bark, bird holes and hollow interiors.
  • Avoid the use of pesticides. Spot treatments with herbicides may be used in exceptional circumstances (e.g., noxious weeds) where it can be demonstrated that the herbicide will not be harmful to the species or habitat being managed.

Landscape unit planning considerations (not mandatory)

Keen's long-eared myotis requires mature and old, low elevation, coastal western hemlock forest for foraging and roosting habitat. Treed linkage corridors should be maintained to ensure connectivity between roosting habitat and riparian foraging habitat, because most bat species take advantage of forest edges as movement corridors. These linkage requirements should be considered and accommodated within any forest ecosystem networks that are established through a landscape unit plan.


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