Forest Practices Code, Province of B.C.

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This Forest Practices Code Guidebook is presented for information only

It is not cited in regulation. The Forest and Range Practices Act and its regulations took effect on Jan. 31, 2004. This replaced the Forest Practices Code of British Columbia Act and regulations. For further information please see the Forest and Range Practices Act.

Biodiversity Guidebook

September 1995


Authority

Forest Practices Code of British Columbia Act
Straegic Planning Regulations
Operational Planning Regulation

Table of Contents

Acronyms used in this guidebook

Introduction

Biodiversity management
Relationships to other guidebooks

Biodiversity emphasis options

Applying biodiversity emphasis options to landscape units

Establishing landscape unit biodiversity objectives

Establishing seral stage objectives for natural disturbance types
Cutblock size and biodiversity objectives
Natural disturbance type 1: ecosystems with rare stand-initiating events
Biogeoclimatic units in NDT1
Seral stage distribution (NDT1)
Temporal and spatial distribution of the cut and leave areas (NDT1)
Old seral stage retention and representativeness (NDT1)
Landscape connectivity (NDT1)
Stand structure (NDT1)
Species composition (NDT1)
Natural disturbance type 2: ecosystems with infrequent stand-initiating events
Biogeoclimatic units in NDT2
Seral stage distribution (NDT2)
Temporal and spatial distribution of the cut and leave areas (NDT2)
Old seral stage retention and representativeness (NDT2)
Landscape connectivity (NDT2)
Stand structure (NDT2)
Species composition (NDT2)
Natural disturbance type 3: ecosystems with frequent stand-initiating events
Biogeoclimatic units in NDT3
Seral stage distribution (NDT3)
Temporal and spatial distribution of the cut and leave areas (NDT3)
Old seral stage retention and representativeness (NDT3)
Landscape connectivity (NDT3)
Stand structure (NDT3)
Species composition (NDT3)
Natural disturbance type 4: ecosystems with frequent stand-maintaining fires
Biogeoclimatic units in NDT4
Seral stage distribution (NDT4)
Temporal and spatial distribution of patch sizes (NDT4)
Temporal and spatial distribution of the cut and leave areas (NDT4)
Old seral stage rangeland retention (NDT4)
Old seral stage forest retention and representativeness (NDT4)
Landscape connectivity (NDT4)
Stand structure (NDT4)
Species composition (NDT4)
Natural disturbance type 5: alpine tundra and subalpine parkland
Biogeoclimatic units in NDT5
Seral stage distribution (potential natural community) (NDT5)
Temporal and spatial distribution of the cut and leave areas (NDT5)
Old-seral stage retention and representativeness (NDT5)
Landscape connectivity (NDT5)
Stand structure (NDT5)

Designing forest ecosystem networks

Principal steps in designing a FEN
Management within FENs

Stand management to maintain biodiversity

Maintaining stand structure
Wildlife trees
Wildlife trees patches (group reserves) and individual live tree retention
Creating wildlife trees
Other stand structure recommendations
Maintaining tree and vegetation species composition
Maintaining coarse woody debris

Glossary

Appendices

  1. Landscape level biodiversity concepts
  2. Comparison of biodiversity emphasis options
  3. Biogeoclimatic units, natural disturbance types and locations
  4. Estimation of natural seral stage distributions
  5. Important stand attributes
  6. Classes of wildlife trees

Tables

  1. The distribution of biodiversity emphasis options within a subregional planning area
  2. Seral stage definitions by biogeoclimatic zones in NDT1
  3. Recommended seral stage distribution for NDT1
  4. Recommended distribution of patch sizes (harvest units and leave areas) for NDT1
  5. The frequency with which connectivity characteristics of natural mature/old seral stage ecosystems occur for all biogeoclimatic subzones of NDT1
  6. Seral stage definitions by biogeoclimatic zones in NDT2
  7. Recommended seral stage distribution for NDT2
  8. Recommended distribution of patch sizes (harvest units and leave areas) for NDT2
  9. The frequency with which connectivity characteristics of natural mature/old seral stage ecosystems occur for all biogeoclimatic subzones of NDT2
  10. Seral stage definition for biogeoclimatic zones in NDT3
  11. Recommended seral stage distribution for NDT3
  12. Recommended distribution of patch sizes (harvest units and leave areas) for biogeoclimatic subzones with Douglas-fir throughout stands in NDT3
  13. Recommended distribution of patch sizes (harvest units and leave areas) for biogeoclimatic subzones with Douglas-fir restricted or absent in NDT3
  14. Recommended distribution of patch sizes (harvest units and leave areas) for alluvial ecosystems in the BWBS biogeoclimatic zone in NDT3
  15. The frequency with which connectivity characteristics of natural mature/old seral stage ecosystems occur for all biogeoclimatic subzones of NDT3
  16. Seral stage definitions for biogeoclimatic zones in NDT4
  17. Recommended seral stage distribution for NDT4
  18. Recommended distribution of patch sizes (harvest units and leave areas) for NDT4
  19. The frequency with which connectivity characteristics of natural mature/old seral stage ecosystems occur for all biogeoclimatic subzones of NDT4
  20. (a). Percentage of a cutblock area required as wildlife tree patches when landscape units have been designated and landscape level biodiversity objectives have been established
  21. (b).Percentage of a cutblock area required as wildlife tree patches when landscape units have not been designated

Figures

  1. Levels at which the maintenance of biodiversity can be considered
  2. The relationship between the Biodiversity Guidebook and the Riparian Management Area and Managing Identified Wildlife guidebooks
  3. The range of management options for maintaining biodiversity
  4. Example of the application and distribution of biodiversity emphasis options for landscape units within a subregional planning area
  5. The distribution of NDTs across British Columbia
  6. A landscape managed to maintain biodiversity
  7. A portion of the landscape managed to maintain biodiversity
  8. Applying wildlife tree management recommendations to a proposed cutblock
  9. Reserves for wildlife trees incorporated into four silvicultural systems
  10. Harvesting areas with wildlife trees maintained in a riparian management area and a gully complex
  11. Artificially created wildlife trees

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