Mountain Pine Beetle Research


Overview
Current Research Areas
        Hydrology, Geomorphology, and Fisheries
        Soils
        Wildlife, Ecology, Range, and Biodiversity
        Silviculture, and Growth and Yield
        Strategic Analysis, Planning, and Decision Support
        Climate
        Genetics
        Shelf Life
Research Extension Activities
Strategic Planning and Policy Consultation
Recent Publications and Presentations
Ministry Contact

Overview

British Columbia is currently experiencing the largest recorded mountain pine beetle outbreak in North America.  This epidemic has resulted in widespread mortality of lodgepole pine, British Columbia interior’s most abundant tree species.  As mountain pine beetle populations increase in southern British Columbia as well as at higher elevations there is also increasing mortality of both ponderosa and whitebark pine. The epidemic puts many forest values at risk and threatens the stability and economic well-being of many interior resource-dependent communities. 

The provincial Mountain Pine Beetle Action Plan identifies an overall goal to “sustain the long-term economic and environmental well-being of impacted communities, while dealing with the short-term consequences of the epidemic.” The Forest Science Program has several multi-faceted research projects under way that support many of the objectives identified in the Action Plan.  Each year, landscape ecology researchers update the Provincial-Level Projections of the Current Mountain Pine Beetle Outbreak [link] that predict the future extent of the mountain pine beetle outbreak. These projections are used in a wide variety of research projects, including models to assess hydrologic impacts to watersheds following both pine mortality and any subsequent salvage harvesting. 

The Research Branch has developed a Mountain Pine Beetle Stewardship Research Strategy and a Mountain Pine Beetle Research Strategy Implementation Framework that identify and prioritize knowledge gaps associated with the mountain pine beetle outbreak and its impact on forest resources. Researchers actively participate on policy and technical committees to co-ordinate research and extension activities, and to ensure that information generated supports implementing the Mountain Pine Beetle Action Plan and parallel initiatives within the Ministry, such as Forests for Tomorrow and the Future Forest Ecosystems Initiative

This web page provides a summary of the numerous mountain pine beetle research projects, extension activities, and consultations taking place within the Research Branch and regional Forest Science Programs. It is organized by the generic research disciplines defined by the Mountain Pine Beetle Stewardship Research Strategy [link]. In addition, the Ministry Library has an extensive bibliography on the mountain pine beetle.  Other extensive and detailed information about the mountain pine beetle and the current outbreak can be found on the Ministry of Forests and Range mountain pine beetle home page.

Current Research AreasTop

Hydrology, Geomorphology, and Fisheries

  • Assessing small-stream temperature and riparian condition in mountain pine beetle-and salvage harvesting-affected watersheds to identify their present state of ecological function and to propose best management practices for mountain pine beetle-affected areas. [more]

  • Conducting a retrospective study to determine the impacts of massive salvage logging following spruce beetle infestation in sensitive drainages of the Bowron watershed on the function of stream channels and riparian forests 30 years later. Research results will identify best management practices for mountain pine beetle-related salvage harvesting activities at the landscape/watershed scale.

  • Studying hydrologic effects of mountain pine beetle management activities on stand water balance and water-table elevations. Identifying where and why forested and logged areas are wet. Developed effective watershed, forest cover, and site indicators to assess watersheds at risk. [link]

  • Assessing the benefits and potential geomorphic and hydrologic consequences of a variety of retention strategies at both the site level (e.g., riparian reserves, partial cutting) and watershed level (e.g., Equivalent Clearcut Area), and in a temporal context for water and terrain conservation.

  • Modelling hydrology and slope stability of mountain pine beetle-affected watersheds.

  • Monitoring stream channel morphology in unlogged and logged watersheds throughout the southern interior with very diverse historical disturbance and ecology, and associated forest management concerns, such as use by independent power producers, mountain pine beetle infestations and salvage logging implications, susceptibility to climate change, and fire.

  • Determining the effects of forest cover on snow accumulation and ablation in mature, regenerating, and clearcut forest cover types, as well as in areas where overstorey mortality has occurred following mountain pine beetle attack. [more]

  • Testing the operational applicability of a novel approach to aerial photography for detecting secondary stand structure in lodgepole pine stands.
  • Evaluating the effectiveness of constructing ditches as a treatment for restoring a cutblock's water drainage patterns after salvage logging.

Soils

  • Investigating the impacts of intensive fertilization regimes on soil biology in pine and spruce plantations in the interior of British Columbia, with implications for mitigating mid-term timber supply falldown.

  • Providing technical expertise and problem-solving on forest management concerns related to changes in soil-water relations and soil physical processes within mountain pine beetle salvaged areas.

  • Developing tools to more effectively monitor the effects of the mountain pine beetle epidemic on the spatial distribution of pine mushrooms. [more]
  • Investigating the effects on forest soils of mountain pine beetle infestation in ponderosa pine stands.
  • Testing the use of aerial photos as a practical method to extensively survey for soil disturbance from salvage logging.

Wildlife, Ecology, Range, and BiodiversityTop

  • Developing and parameterizing models for analyzing the spatial distribution of mountain pine beetle outbreaks in relation to climate and stand characteristics. These models are important for determining conservation implications and ecological restoration options.
  • Completing a database on natural disturbance that collects and digitizes all available historical and contemporary maps of wildfire and insect outbreaks in British Columbia (in collaboration with the Canadian Forest Service). This information will improve understanding of the probability, frequency, pattern, and interactions between natural disturbance events, such as wildfire and mountain pine beetle outbreaks. [link]

  • Gathering and summarizing current and historical literature on disturbance history for each biogeoclimatic zone. 
  • Studying the implications of grizzly bear and moose response to historical salvage logging for mountain pine beetle in the 1970s outbreak in the Flathead Valley.

  • Re-measuring mountain pine beetle permanent sample plots to improve our prediction of the ecological and economic benefits and tradeoffs of three potential management options: no interference, prescribed burning, and conventional timber harvesting.

  • Studying the implications of mountain pine beetle salvage harvesting and retention strategies on mountain and woodland caribou habitat, and developing decision support tools that consider both spatial and temporal placement of cutting treatments.
  • Conducting retrospective studies and monitoring ponderosa pine stands affected by mountain pine beetle in the Thompson River valley.

  • Studying the impact of the mountain pine beetle outbreak on wildlife habitat, breeding birds, and biodiversity attributes in the Cariboo region.

  • Developing multi-stand planning and retention strategies to maintain landscape-level wildlife habitat and biodiversity during the salvage harvesting of mountain pine beetle-attacked areas in the interior. [pdf]
  • Identifying the site and climatic variables in areas forested with lodgepole pine that produce non-timber forest products of high value to First Nations.
  • Monitoring the natural ecological changes taking place after the mountain pine beetle outbreak to determine how tree growth, wildlife habitat, non-timber forest products, and other ecological values respond.
  • Testing livestock management techniques for controlling cattle movement on rangelands to replace the function once played by natural barriers of thick lodgepole pine stands.

Silviculture, and Growth and YieldTop

  • Improving our understanding of the impact of the mountain pine beetle infestation and forest management responses on regeneration and stand structure. This research supports modelling growth and yield impacts and evaluating regeneration strategies.

  • Determining the extent and abundance of secondary structure in stands heavily affected by the mountain pine beetle, and using the model SORTIE-ND to explore the implication of different silvicultural strategies in beetle-affected forests.

  • Parameterizing TASS III for use in growing advanced regeneration to predict viable future timber sources as well as to better understand and predict the quality of wood from post-harvest and post-beetle stands.

  • Studying the impacts of silvicultural treatments on wood quality characteristics of lodgepole pine to improve the modelling capabilities of TASS, such as the effects of crown ratio on the transition from juvenile to mature wood production. [abstract]

  • Determining the carbon budget implications of a rapid input of carbon from the foliar biomass loss that results from mountain pine beetle attack in lodgepole pine forests.

  • Re-measuring a 40-year-old selective logging trial to examine spruce regeneration under different densities of pine.

  • Studying the response of repressed pine to fertilization and thinning. An Extension Note summarizes 5-year results of this study. [pdf]

  • Examining the amount and distribution of advance regeneration in mountain pine beetle-attacked stands in the Montane Spruce zone. [pdf].

  • Studying the use of fertilization, thinning, and vegetation management treatments for enhancing early stand growth in mountain pine beetle-affected stands.
  • Examining the PrognosisBC growth and yield model's ability to predict natural regeneration following mountain pine beetle infestation.
  • Investigating the factors causing the exceptionally high mortality of ponderosa pine trees in recent years.
  • Revisiting long-term research trials to determine how stands recover after removal of the mature pine overstorey.
  • Investigating whether the spread of Armillaria root fungus is inhibited in stands of beetle-killed trees to determine the extent to which control measures are required for areas subject to the disease.
  • Synthesized existing information from previously measured plots in pine-leading stands of the Caribou-Chilcotin and compiling a database for resource managers on secondary stand structure.

Strategic Analysis, Planning, and Decision SupportTop

  • Providing provincial-level modelling and analysis of the mountain pine beetle outbreak and management responses. Refining models that analyze the impacts of the current outbreak and management actions, including incorporating Landsat imagery to improve the resolution of aerial overviews of forest health. [link]

  • Providing technical support to develop new inventory and monitoring methods and procedures for mountain pine beetle-affected areas.

  • Providing analysis and decision support to the Chief Forester, the Forest Analysis and Inventory Branch, and District staff on the impacts of mountain pine beetle, including developing summaries of annual and cumulative kill by management unit.

  • Updating provincial tree species selection guidelines and developing decision-making tools that provide science-based information, analysis, and reporting that will assist practitioners in their tree species management decisions, in light of forest health considerations such as the mountain pine beetle outbreak.

  • Designing strategic analysis frameworks for forest and wildlife management that account for the uncertainty created by such factors as mountain pine beetle outbreaks and climate change. [more]

  • Developing a toolkit model approach to sustainable forest management planning that better achieves a balance between science and local needs.

  • Using simulation modelling to examine long-term wildlife stewardship implications of management strategies for the mountain pine beetle outbreak. This research focuses on species associated with mid- to late-seral forest that are potentially sensitive to habitat arrangement, such as marten, red squirrels, and flying squirrels.

  • Analyzing landscape-level issues, including landscape-level disturbance ecology, patch size and distribution, fragmentation, and seral stage distribution, to develop decision-making models for planning and management in the southern interior.

ClimateTop

  • Studying and comparing the annual water balance of high-elevation lodgepole pine forests, clearcuts, and regenerating stands, including snow and rainfall interception, and snowmelt.

  • Studying the influence of mountain pine beetle disturbance on the forest carbon balance at the Kennedy Siding ungulate winter range. [more]

  • Analyzing climate variability and trends in northern British Columbia and relating them to a variety of forest management issues such as the soil and hydrologic changes related to the mountain pine beetle.
  • Investigating changes in radiation balance within stands affected by mountain pine beetle to better understand responses related to hydrology and regeneration.

Genetics

  • Studying lodgepole pine genetic variation to determine the significance of the effects of provenance and family variation. This research is demonstrating that the mountain pine beetle makes choices with respect to initial colonizations of trees under moderate rates of attack.

  • Expanded lodgepole pine seed orchards from parent tree selections made from 1987 and 1988 in response to increased seed needs due to the mountain pine beetle epidemic.
  • Seeking to identify the molecular, biochemical, or physical tree characteristics that confer resistance in lodgepole pine against bark beetles.
  • Screening for superior lodgepole pine families from two seed planning zones where no genetically improved material currently exists, to identify seed sources for establishing the most productive second growth stands.

Shelf Life

  • Modelling the 20-year shelf life of mountain pine beetle-killed wood in terms of how log grades change.  By linking this to the projection of mountain pine beetle mortality, this research has improved knowledge of the available fibre supply and economic outputs under various harvesting scenarios. [link] Top

Research Extension Activities

  • Synthesizing information in a new Extension Note on stand-level practices that will help protect and maintain habitat structure and wildlife diversity during large-scale salvage harvesting. “Guidelines for forest managers and planners.” [SI04 04 pdf]

  • Updating the Mountain Pine Beetle Stewardship Research Strategy, in partnership with the Protection Branch, to include fire management issues.

  • Providing advice to the Southern Interior and Northern Interior Regional Management Teams on growth and yield and regeneration options in mountain pine–beetle infested areas.

  • Providing input and advice to the Nature Conservancy of Canada on how to incorporate mountain pine beetle impacts in their Central Interior Ecoregional Assessment. [more]

  • Reviewing Forest Stewardship plans for silvicultural prescriptions and tree species selection in mountain pine beetle–affected areas.

  • Advising BC Timber Sales on options for dealing with the hydrologic concerns resulting from salvage logging of mountain pine beetle stands.

  • Developing a web-based presentation to serve as a training tool on fire, riparian zones, and the effects of the mountain pine beetle and salvage logging.

  • Developing a special topic bibliography on Mountain Pine Beetle that includes more than 800 citations, many of which are available electronically.

  • Presenting the results of the mountain pine beetle simulation modelling and the impacts of variable retention strategies on wildlife at a FORREX workshop, reaching forest managers and practitioners throughout British Columbia. [pdf]

  • Made major extension efforts on mountain pine beetle effects on watershed hydrology, with presentations to the Cattlemen’s Association, district Timber Supply Analysis steering committees, Regional Management Team, First Nations Band Councils, and the public.

  • Developing web page summaries on hydrologic risks to third-order watersheds due to the mountain pine beetle in the British Columbia interior. [link]

  • Organized and presented at the Mountain pine beetle and watershed hydrology workshop: preliminary results of research from BC, Alberta and Colorad, July 10, 2007, Kelowna, British Columbia. The goal of this workshop was to assist forest managers and licensees to be proactive in planning salvage operations. It was also of interest to non-forestry sectors, such as municipal and local governments, concerned with flooding and water supply concerns. [abstracts]Top
  • Advised Forest Practices Branch and licensees on using fertilization in immature forests to mitigate declines in midterm timber supply.
  • Consulted with Ministry staff regarding detrimental soil disturbance resulting from some salvage logging operations in mountain pine beetle-infested stands.
  • Gave presentations on tree recruitment dynamics in stands affected by mountain pine beetle and the implications for future secondary forest structure.

Strategic Planning and Policy Consultation

Mountain Pine Beetle Stewardship Research Strategy and Mountain Pine Beetle Implementation Plan, Lead Co-ordination and Technical Advisory roles – Provided the Chief Forester with an analysis of forest stewardship needs and research knowledge gaps and priorities, identified by both client groups and researchers. 

Forests for Tomorrow
  • Operational Fertilization Program, Technical Advisory role – Accelerating the development of immature spruce and Douglas-fir stands to partially mitigate the negative impacts of the current mountain pine beetle epidemic on the mid-term timber supply.

  • Developing site selection criteria for Type I and Type II silviculture strategies, appropriate fertilization, thinning options, and monitoring protocol. On-going monitoring will validate current stand development models and predict future growth response of treated stands, as well as determine the impact on non-timber resources.

  • Advising on grass-seeding considerations following wildfires and assessing older site preparation experiments for insight into management options post-mountain pine beetle.

  • Effectiveness Evaluations and Research Working Group –Co-ordinating and implementing monitoring and evaluation projects related to issues affecting forest stands killed by mountain pine beetle or wildfire.

  • Using TASS III to grow advanced regeneration to determine whether there will be a viable timber source in the future and to better understand and predict the quality of wood from post-harvest and post-beetle stands, particularly in areas managed for spruce.

  • Providing technical advice on issues related to the assessment of reforestation effectiveness of burned and mountain pine beetle–infested lands specific to riparian areas.

Mountain Pine Beetle Inventory and Monitoring Project Team, Forest Analysis and Inventory Branch – Providing technical advice to the Forest Analysis and Inventory Branch to develop new inventory/monitoring methods and procedures for mountain pine beetle-affected areas.

Mountain Pine Beetle Provincial Analysis Team – Mid-term Timber Supply Group, Forest Analysis and Inventory Branch – Providing technical input and tools for determining the impact of mountain pine beetle on mid-term timber supply by forest management unit. 

Mountain Pine Beetle Survey Group, Inventory Branch – Using model analysis and mapping products to assist in developing a field sampling plan for infestation levels. 

MPB Research Issues Co-ordinating Committee – Chairing a committee to coordinate research priorities and funding allocations between all the various research agencies and funding bodies. 

Inventory and Timber Analysis Committee (ITAC)– Addressing inventory-related issues associated with mountain pine beetle, including updating forest inventory, creating various mapping products of mountain pine beetle mortality, estimating shelf life, and incorporating secondary structure into forest analysis. 

First Nations Mountain Pine Beetle Initiative, Technical Support – Providing support to First Nations in the development of a strategy to address issues and concerns related to the effects of mountain pine beetle in traditional territories [more]

Cariboo-Chilcotin Land Use Plan - Biodiversity Conservation Strategy and updates.

Mountain Pine Beetle Hydrologic Modelling Steering Committee – Providing technical advice for the Ministry of Environment's modelling of the mountain pine beetle epidemic's effects on Fraser Basin water flows.Top

Recent Publications and Presentations

Bravi, B. and B.K. Chapman. 2009. Managing for Pine Mushrooms through the Mountain Pine Beetle Epidemic in the West Chilcotin: Second Edition. B.C. Min. For. Range, S. Int. For. Reg., Kamloops, B.C. Exten. Note 09.

Krzic, M., L. Zabek, C.E. Bulmer, B.K. Chapman, and C. Tretheway. 2009. Soil properties and lodgepole pine growth on forest landings rehabilitated by tillage and fertilizer application. Can. J. Soil Sci. 89: 25-34.

Astrup, R., K.D. Coates, and E. Hall. 2008. Recruitment limitation in forests: Lessons from an unprecedented mountain pine beetle epidemic. For. Ecol. Manag. 256: 1743-1750.

Berch, S.M. and R.P. Brockley. 2008. Effects of repeated fertilization on fine roots, mycorrhizae, and soil mesofauna in young lodgepole pine and spruce forests in central British Columbia. B.C. Min. For. Range, Res. Br., Victoria, B.C. Exten. Note 84.

Brockley, R.P. 2008. Can thinning and fertilizing young lodgepole pine mitigate future timber supply challenges? B.C. Min. For. Range, Res. Br., Victoria, B.C. Exten. Note 82.

Dubé, S. and J. Rex. 2008. Hydrologic effects of mountain pine beetle infestation and salvage-harvesting operations. B.C. J. Ecosystems Manage. 9(3):134.

Heemskerk, B.H., C. DeLong, and T. Milner. 2008. A framework for documenting the effects of the mountain pine beetle outbreak in sub-boreal forests of Northern British Columbia (E.P. 1369): Establishment Report. B.C. Min. For. Range, Res. Br., Victoria, B.C. Tech. Rep. 046.  

Nigh, G.D., J.A. Antos, and R. Parish. 2008a. Density and distribution of advance regeneration in mountain pine beetle killed lodgepole pine stands of the Montane Spruce zone of southern British Columbia. Can. J. For. Res. 38(11): 2826-2836.

Nigh, G.D., J.A. Antos, and R. Parish. 2008b. Tools to help forest managers with regeneration decisions about beetle-killed stands in the Montane Spruce zone of the Merritt Timber Supply Area. B.C. Min. For. Range, Res. Br., Victoria, B.C. Exten. Note 83.

Nordin, L. 2008. The Bowron River watershed: A synoptic assessment of stream and riparian condition 20-30 years after salvage logging. B.C. Min. For. Range, Res. Br., Victoria, B.C. Exten. Note 86.

Nordin, L., D. Maloney, J. Rex, P. Krauskopf, P. Tschaplinski, and D. Hogan. 2008. The Bowron River Watershed: A Landscape Level Assessment of Post-Beetle Change in Stream Riparian Function. Mountain Pine Beetle Working Paper 2008-22. B.C. Min. For. Range, N. Int. For. Reg., Prince George, B.C. MPBI Project # 7.03. 35 p.

Nordin, L.J., J.F. Rex, D.A. Maloney, and P.J. Tschaplinski. 2008. Standardized Approaches in Effectiveness Monitoring Programs and Regional Relevance: Lessons from the Bowron River Watershed Riparian Evaluation Project. Can. J. For. Res. 38: 3130-3150.

Redding, T., R. Winkler, P. Teti, D. Spittlehouse, S. Boon, J. Rex, S. Dubé, R.D. Moore, A. Wei, M. Carver, M. Schnorbus, L. Reese-Hansen, and S. Chatwin. 2008. Mountain pine beetle and watershed hydrology. B.C. J. Ecosystems Manage. 9(3): 33-50.

Sanborn, P.T. and R.P. Brockley. [2008]. Litter decomposition in a young lodgepole pine - Sitka alder stand in the central interior of British Columbia. Plant and Soil. Submitted.

Teti, P. 2008. Sampling secondary structure on novel aerial photographs. B.C. J. Ecosystems Manage. 9(3): 98-100.

Winkler, R.D., J.F. Rex, P. Teti, D.A. Maloney, and T. Redding. 2008. Mountain pine beetle, forest practices, and watershed management. B.C. Min. For. Range, Res. Br., Victoria, B.C. Exten. Note 88.

Yanchuk, A.D. 2008. Genetics of bark beetle host choice and tree resistance: Possibilities for breeding, and the Red Queen running backwards? Paper presented at the 2008 Ecological Society of America Annual Meeting, November 16-19, 2008.

Yanchuk, A.D., J.C. Murphy, and K.F. Wallin. 2008. Evaluation of genetic variation of attack and resistance in lodgepole pine in the early stages of a mountain pine beetle outbreak. Tree Genetics and Genomes. 4(2): 171-180

Berch, S.M. and R. Brockley. 2007. Impacts of fertilization on soil biota of young lodgepole pine and interior spruce stands in the interior of British Columbia. Presentation at North American Forest Ecology Workshop, Univ. British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C.

Brockley, R.P. 2007. Effects of 12 years of repeated fertilization on the foliar nutrition and growth of young lodgepole pine in the central interior of British Columbia. Can. J. For. Res. 37: 2115-2129.

Brockley, R.P. 2007. Assessing the effects of fertilization on understorey vegetation in young lodgepole pine and spruce forests in central British Columbia. B.C. Min. For. Range, Victoria. Exten. Note 81.

Brockley, R.P and P. Sanborn. 2007. Assessing the effects of Sitka alder on the growth and foliar nutrition of young lodgepole pine in central British Columbia (SBSdw3): 9-year results. B.C. Min. For. Range, Victoria, B.C. Exten. Note 79.

Brown, M., T.A. Black, Z. Nesic, A. Fredeen, P. Jackson, P. Burton, T. Trofymow, D. Spittlehouse, D. Gaumont-Guay, R. Ketler, D. Lessard, N. Grant, A. Sauter, V. Egginton, and A. Hum. 2007. Impact of the mountain pine beetle on the carbon balance of lodgepole pine stands in western Canada. Poster presented at the Kennedy Siding Mountain Pine Beetle Research Field Trip, Oct. 30, 2007.

Campbell, E., R. Alfaro, and B. Hawkes. 2007. Spatial distribution of mountain pine beetle outbreaks in relation to climate and stand characteristics: a dendroecological analysis. J. Integr. Plant Biol. 49:168-178. 

Campbell, E. and A. Carroll. 2007. Climate-related changes in the vulnerability of whitebark pine to mountain pine beetle outbreaks in British Columbia. Nutcracker Notes 12: 13-15. 

DeLong, C., B. Heemskerk, and T. Milner. 2007. Monitoring ecological changes in MPB-impacted stands. FIA-FSP Forest Science Corner. FORREX Forest Research Extension Partnership. Link 8(1). [pdf]

de Montigny, L., G. Nigh, and R. Archer. 2007. MPB research stewardship strategy implementation framework. B.C. Min. For., Res. Br., Victoria, B.C. [pdf]

Klenner, W. and D. Lewis. 2007. Retention planning for wildlife habitat and biodiversity during salvage harvesting, and some obstacles to implementation. In Overcoming obstacles to variable retention in forest management: Science to management forum proc., Sep. 25-27, 2007. B.C. J. Ecosystems Manage. 8(3):157-163. [pdf] 

Lindgren, P.M.F., T.P. Sullivan, D.S. Sullivan, R.P. Brockley, and R. Winter. 2007. Growth response of young lodgepole pine to thinning and repeated fertilization treatments: 10-year results. Forestry. 80(5): 587-611.

Newsome, T.A. 2007. Stand tending or rehabilitation: can height growth in height-repressed lodgepole pine stands be increased? B.C. Min. For. Range, S. Int. For. Reg., Kamloops, B.C. Exten. Note 07. [pdf

Redding, T. and R. Pike. 2007.  Mountain pine beetle and watershed hydrology: Workshop summary. Streamline 11(1). [pdf

Redding, T., R.G. Pike, and P. Teti. 2007.  Understanding mountain pine beetle and salvage harvesting effects on hydrological processes and watershed response. Poster Presentation.  Mountain Pine Beetle and Watershed Hydrology Workshop: Preliminary Results of Research from BC and Alberta. Jul. 10, 2007. Kelowna. B.C. [pdf

Spittlehouse, D.L. 2007. The influence of mountain pine beetle on site water balance of lodgepole pine forests. Workshop presentation at: Mountain pine beetle and watershed hydrology workshop: preliminary results of research from B.C., Alberta and Colorado. FORREX, B.C. Min. For. Range, B.C. Min. Environ., Canadian Water Resources Association. Jul. 10, 2007, Kelowna, B.C. [abstracts] 

Steen, O.A., M.J. Waterhouse, H.M. Armleder, and N.M. Daintith. 2007. Natural regeneration of lodgepole pine following partial cutting on northern caribou winter range in west-central British Columbia. B.C. J. Ecosystems Manage. 8(1):61-74. [pdf

Steventon, J.D. 2007. Landscape strategies for mountain pine beetle management: Some stewardship implications. Forest Science Program, Forest Innovation and Investment, B.C. Min. For. Range. Victoria, B.C. Annu. Progress Rep. 

Steventon, J.D. and F. Doyle. 2007. Role of complex stands in conserving vertebrate diversity in beetle affected landscapes. Presentaion to Complex Stands Research and Management Conference. Bulkley Valley Centre for Natural Resources Research and Management, Smithers, B.C. Mar. 2007. [pdf

Walton, A. and J. Hughes. 2007. Provincial-level projection of the current mountain pine beetle outbreak: Documentation of revisions to the model resulting in BCMPB.v4. [link

Walton, A., J. Hughes, M. Eng, A. Fall, T. Shore, B. Riel, and P. Hall. 2007. Provincial-level projection of the current mountain pine beetle outbreak: update of the infestation projection based on the 2006 provincial aerial overview of the forest health and revisions to “the model” (BCMPB.v4). [link

Xie, C.-Y., J.C. Murphy, and M.R. Carlson. 2007. Predicting individual breeding values and making forward selections for seed production of interior lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta ssp. latifolia) in British Columbia. New Forests. 33(2): 125-138.

Berch S.M., R.P. Brockley, J. Battigelli, S. Hagerman, and B. Holl. 2006. Impacts of repeated fertilization on components of the soil biota under a young lodgepole pine stand in the interior of British Columbia. Can. J. For. Res. 36(6):1415–1426. 

Brockley, R.P 2006. Comparing the effects of urea and ammonium nitrate fertilizers on the growth and foliar nutrition of lodgepole pine: 6-year results. B.C. Min. For. Range, Victoria, B.C. Exten. Note 78.

Cariboo-Chilcotin Land Use Planning Biodiversity Conservation Strategy Committee. 2006. An integrated strategy for management of biodiversity and bark beetles in Douglas-fir and spruce stands. Cariboo Managers Committee, Biodiversity Update 7b. [pdf

Coates, K.D., E.C. Hall, and R. Astrup. 2006. Improving prediction of juvenile tree growth in mountain pine beetle damaged stands.  Extension Note.  Bulkley Valley Centre for Natural Resources Research and Management, Smithers B.C. Exten. Note. 

Dube, S., B. Chapman, and S. Berch. 2006. Monitoring soil disturbance on harvested areas within the Mountain Pine Beetle Infestation. Final Tech. Rep. FIS-Forest Science Program project number: M065005.

Nigh, G., L. de Montigny, M. Eng, and R. Archer. 2006. Development of a research strategy for mountain pine beetle issues associated with Forest Stewardship Division Functions. B.C. Min. For. Range, Res. Br., Victoria, B.C. Tech. Rep. 034.

Klenner, W. 2006. Retention strategies to maintain habitat structure and wildlife diversity during the salvage harvesting of mountain pine beetle attack areas in the southern interior forest region. B.C. Min. For. Range, S. Int. For. Reg. Exten. Note RSI-04. [pdf]

Rex, J. and S. Dubé. 2006. Predicting the risk of wet ground areas in the Vanderhoof Forest District: Project description and progress report. B.C. J. Ecosystems and Manage. 7(2):57-71. 

Steventon, J.D. 2006. Northern flying squirrels and red squirrels: is there life after beetles and logging? Bulkley Valley Centre for Natural Resources Research and Management. Exten. Note 2. 6pp. [pdf] 

Uulina, L., B. Guy, and R.G. Pike. 2006. Hydrologic effects of mountain pine beetle in the interior pine forest of British Columbia: Key questions and current knowledge. Streamline Watershed Manage. Bull. 9(2) [pdf

Ministry Contact

Evelyn Hamilton

 

Ministry contact: Evelyn Hamilton.
Please direct questions regarding webpage to For.Prodres@gov.bc.ca

Updated May 2009