Root Disease Management Course - Root Disease Identification


DAY 1 - Classroom Session 1 Participant Objectives:

 The Forest Practices Code Root Disease Management Guide Book:

A. The Role of the RDM Guide Book -
About 10 min.
B. What the RDM Guide Book Contains - About 20 min.
The Role and Impact of Root Disease - About 30 min.
Step 1 of the 5-Phase Management Process (optional) - About 30 min.
Root Disease Identification - About 1 hr.

 - Understand and be able to explain the role of the RDM Guide.

- Leam how to consider root disease in silviculture and stand management prescriptions.

- Be able to assess the inherent root disease risk in a particular zone.

- Become familiar with the appearance of the three main root diseases in B. C. under various conditions and in various species.

ROOT DISEASE IDENTIFICATION

LECTURE & DISCUSSION and EXERCISE, ABOUT 1 HOUR

 The intent of this section is to introduce the participants to the visual qualities of root disease and prepare them for the field identification exercise which follows.

You will spend the first portion of this section on the key points outlined in the following pages. Then, you will present the material you have prepared ahead of time: slides and other visual aids such as videos and actual root disease samples-along with supporting lecture and discussion points-so that participants hone their skills in visually identifying root disease.

PREPARATION: The Root Disease Identification section requires that you prepare sufficient visual support material to demonstrate the visual differences between healthy and diseased trees and between various root diseases. Visual support material may include slides, videos, and actual samples brought in from the field to the classroom.

You are also required to prepare your own lecture notes for much of this section. For more information, see the "Preparation" section in the beginning of this guide.

 Points to remember when showing visual support material for root disease identification:

· Discuss symptoms and signs of various root diseases and clearly distinguish between each

· view root disease examples under varying conditions including host, zone, and with other pathogens

· Examine difficulty of pathogen recognition in a given range where the existence of several root diseases is common.

· Emphasize the similarities between symptoms of Laminated and Armillaria, and between Laminated and tomentosus.

 Instructions  Key Points  Visual Aid

Review the RDM Guidebook's disease identification tools

 

REFERENCE MATERIAL: The Participants' Guide contains additional information related to root disease identification. Be sure to refer participants to this information, and read it yourself before the course starts. A list appears at the end of this section.

Ask participants to describe the difference between a sign and a symptom .

Discuss the diseases which are common in participants' region(s) and their descriptions, and whether there is a predominance of a particular kind of disease in your region due to species susceptibility.

Use OH 16 to direct a general discussion on the differences between signs and symptoms.

 

Some symptoms can be generally ascribed to all three diseases at the stand level.

 

 

 

Some symptoms can be generally ascribed to all three diseases at the tree level.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Some signs can be generally ascribed to all three diseases at the tree level.

 

 

 

 


Use OHs 17 through 19 and the tables in the RDM Guidebook (pp 15-18) to drive your discussion of the specific differences between signs and symptoms produced by each disease .

* PREPARATION: If you have two projection screens, you may want to show these overheads and begin your slide show at the same time.

 

Now, begin your visual presentation and supporting lecture/discussion points which you have prepared ahead of time.

 

* PREPARATION: If you have two projection screens, you may want to show the previous overheads on signs and symptoms along with your slides.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS


· Symptom: An expression by the host that something is wrong

· Sign: An actual indication of the causal agent of the dysfunction


Examples of Symptoms at Stand Level

· Mixture of species

· Openings filled with dead/dying trees

· Poor tree growth, lack of stand vigour

· Insect attack

· Windthrow (with Laminated and Tomentosus )


Examples of Symptoms at Tree Level

· Thinning foliage (all three)

· Bent top (Armillaria)

· Basal resinosis(minor to copious resin flow at base of stem Armillaria)

· Windthrown trees with few or no roots (Laminated)

· Wind thrown spruce trees lacking fine root mass (Tomentosus)


Examples of Signs at Tree Level

· Signs do NOT appear at Stand Level

· Mycelial fan etchings on inner bark of dead trees (Armillaria)

· Annual rings separate into sheets (Laminated)

· Canoeshaped white pitting of the heartwood (Tomentosus)


Differences between signs and symptoms of the various diseases

 

 

 

 

 

 


· Discuss symptoms and signs of various root diseases and clearly distinguish between each

· view root disease examples under varying conditions including host, zone, and with other pathogens

· Examine difficulty of pathogen recognition in a given range where the existence of several root diseases is common.

· Emphasize the similarities between symptoms of Laminated and Armillaria, and Laminated and Tomentosus.


Exercise

1. Verbally describe some root disease signs and symptoms, and ask your participants to name the disease you are describing. Ask them to differentiate between signs and symptoms.

2. Display previously unseen slides and samples. Ask participants to name the root disease present and give supporting reasons.


REFERENCE MATERIAL:

The Participants' Guide contains additional reference material on root disease identification to which you may want to draw participants' attention. Material includes:

· Table: Disease Cycle

· The relationship of root disease to host, age, and vigour

· Interactions of root diseases with other organisms


PARTICIPANT PREPARATION

FOR FIELD SESSION 1

If you are presenting Field Session 1 after this section, remind your participants of what they'll need for the field. Remember, you should give them this information BEFORE the course actually begins. Participants should bring:

· Knife and pulaski or similar tool

· Rain gear, other suitable clothing and footwear

· Hip chain

· Field notebook

· Participants' Guide for this course

· the handout material you will give them for the session including maps of the practice areas and exercise sheets

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Start OH 16

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

End OH 16


start OHs 17,18, 19

 

 

 

 

 

 

End OHs 17,18, 19


Show your prepared visual support material for root disease identification including slides, samples, videos, etc.


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