The State of BC’s Forests The Indicators Jobs and communitiesPDF print version

Indicator 18 – Jobs and communities


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Why is this important?

Forests provide a major source of employment and income for many of B.C.’s communities.

Overview

STATE
mixed
TREND
mixed
INFORMATION
adequate
Questions about jobs and communities
18-1 How many jobs rely on B.C.’s forests?
18-2 How much income is based on B.C.’s forests?
18-3 How dependent on forests are B.C.’s communities?
18-4 How many injuries and fatalities occur in the forest sector?
Ministry of Forests and Range’s assessment

Related indicators


Indicator 18-1

How many jobs rely on B.C.’s forests?


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Why is this important?

A significant portion of the province’s jobs depend on B.C.’s forests.

State and Trend

Information


Indicator 18-2

How much income is based on B.C.’s forests?


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Why is this important?

Income based on forests supports many of B.C.’s workers, their families and communities.

State and Trend

Information


Indicator 18-3

How dependent on forests are B.C.’s communities?


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Why is this important?

Many B.C. communities depend on a strong local forest industry for their economic and social well-being.

State and Trend

Information


Indicator 18-4

How many injuries and fatalities occur in the forest sector?


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Why is this important?

Injuries and fatalities disrupt workers’ lives, families and communities, and reduce the forest sector’s productivity and ability to attract skilled workers.

State and Trend

Information


 

Indicator 18 – Jobs and communities

Ministry of Forests and Range’s assessment

State


mixed
Forest-based employment accounted for 9% of total employment and 10% of labour income in British Columbia in 2000. Timber-based industries accounted for most of this employment, and provided substantially higher average incomes than nature-based tourism and cattle ranching. In more than half of B.C.’s 63 local economies, over 20% of labour income was forest-based in 2001. Many communities and surrounding rural areas are vulnerable to downturns in timber product markets and the impacts of the current mountain pine beetle epidemic. Compared with most other industries, work in timber-based industries can be dangerous. Average benefits paid for forest worker injuries and fatalities are almost four times the average for other industries.

Trend


mixed
Forest-based employment continues to play an important role in B.C.’s economy and communities. However, market pressures and trade disputes have reduced employment in the timber-based industries in recent years, especially along the Coast. As companies continue to reduce their non-skilled labour force in order to stay viable and competitive, communities can no longer rely on timber-based industries to provide employment to large numbers of mill workers and will need to continue looking for employment growth in other sectors. Forest worker injuries and fatalities have generally decreased since the 1970s. A sharp increase in fatalities in 2005 has prompted inquiries into possible causes and solutions.

Information


adequate
Extensive employment and labour income statistics are publicly available. Statistics for nature-based tourism are not tracked separately, and can only be estimated. Changes in the classifications of sub-sectors of timber-based industries may cause minor unreliability of trend analyses by sub-sector. Sophisticated modelling of community dependence on the forest sector and other sectors has been reported periodically. Some injury and fatality data are published annually.

 

 


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