Ministry of ForestsGovernment of British Columbia
Coast Forest Region
Legislation Table of ContentsContact Information for the South Island Forest District
Objectives for Soils ver: 3.8
Site Contents
SIFD Home Page  
Website Index  
Stewardship
A. Objectives Matrix Introduction
B. Objectives set by Government for the FRPA Values
C. Objectives Matrix Site Content List
D. Objectives Matrix FTP Site
1 Soils
2 Timber including Forest Health
3 Wildlife
4 Fish
5 Water
6 Biodiversity
7 Cultural Heritage Resources
8 Resources Features
9 Recreation Resources
10 Visual Quality
11 Forage & Associated Plant Communities
Other Links
FRPA Training Website
FRPA resource evaluation program
Defined Forest Area
Forest Investment Account
Glossary of Forestry Terms

Forestry Acronym

Forest and Range Practices Act site

How to use this web site and where to find information:


1. The Objectives Matrix Soils page contains Objectives set by Government, relevant legislation sections, documents, maps, and useful web links along with a rational in a hierarchical order, specific for the South Island Forest District Planning Area.

2. The Soil elements under the Forest and Range Practices Act (FRPA) includes: objectives for soils (OS); permanent access structures (PAS); soil disturbance limits (SDL); landslides (LS); gully processes (GP); natural surface drainage patterns (NSDP) and revegetation (RV).
Definitions for terms used in regulations can be found in the FPPR Interpretation section.


3. If you are only interested in viewing or downloading the relevant documents, Maps or GIS files, use the Objectives Matrix Table of Content for Soil web page.

4. You can also access or download soils related files directly from the Matrix Soil FTP site.

Using this site is subject to the disclaimer at the bottom of this page.

Note: this page is updated with the December 13, 2004 (objectives matrix Ver.: 3.1) the February 24, 2005 (Ver.: 3.2) March 2005 (Ver.: 3.3) 2006 (Ver.: 3.4), 2007 (Ver: 3.5), 2008 (Ver: 3.6), 2009 (Ver: 3.7), 2010 (Ver: 3.8) amendments to FRPA and the regulations.

  • The sign: indicates that new information has been added.
  • The sign: indicates that this page or a section has been modified or updated on November 24, 2010.

SUMMARY OF HIERARCHY:

  • Responsible Agency: the Ministry of Forests and Range (MoFR) is the mandated agency to address soil values.
  • Hierarchy of Direction: FRPA provides the foundation for directions, however it can be augmented or replace by other legal direction.
    • Currently there are no other directions referring to soil values.
  • Rationale for hierarchy of direction: This is the direction that reflects hierarchy (refine; replace; adds to; consistent with; or no conflicts) when more than one objective exists in a particular area for a particular element.
    • Currently there are no conflicting objectives referring to soil values.
  • Area of Application: defined geographic extent, sub-set of planning area:
    • The soil objectives apply to the entire SIFD area

BREAKDOWN OF DIRECTION:

I. Land Use Objectives:

  • Legal objectives and strategies are contained within approved Higher Level Plans (HLP).
  • Currently there are no land use objectives referring to soils in the higher level plans for the SIFD.

II. Objectives in Regulations:

  • These objectives are set in Sec. 149 (FRPA) of Forest and Range Practices Act, Objectives Set By Government (OSBG) and apply province-wide, and are the most general type of objectives.
  • Sec. 5 (FRPA), of Forest Planning and Practices Regulation, sets the objectives for soils for forestry practices:

"The objective set by government for soils is, without unduly reducing the supply of timber from British Columbia's forests, to conserve the productivity and the hydrologic function of soils"

  • Sec. 6 (RPPR), of Range Planning and Practices Regulation, sets objectives for soils for range practices:

"The objectives set by government for soils are as follows:

(a) protect soil properties;
(b) minimize erosion and compaction;
(c) minimize undesirable disturbance to soils;
(d) maintain a vigorous and diverse cover of desirable plant species with a variety of root depths sufficient to protect the soil;
(e) re-establish ecologically suitable vegetation after disturbance occurs;
(f) maintain ground cover, including sufficient litter and residual dry matter accumulation to protect soil;
(g) minimize accelerated soil erosion; (h) minimize sealing of the soil surface"

  • Sec. 9 (WLPPR) of Woodlot Licence Planning and Practice Regulations refers to the established objectives for Woodlot Licenses:

"For the purpose of section 13 (1) (b) (i) [content of woodlot licence plan] of the Act, the objectives set by government are as follows:
(b) conserving the productivity and the hydrologic function of soils"

Intent: Objectives in regulations are intended to provide goalposts for managing and protecting FRPA values. Results and strategies in operational plans must address and be consistent with these objectives.

Changing Objectives: New or modified objectives in regulation are established through the legislative drafting and amendment process. Objectives in regulations cannot be changed or alternatives proposed at a local level.

III. Objectives Enabled by Regulations:

Objectives enabled by regulation are established by the appropriate Minister, or their delegate, for a specified area. These are the most specific of all objectives, although they are not stated in the regulations, the legislation gives authority to the Ministers, or their delegate, to establish them for various types of areas.

Establishment: The objectives enabled by regulation come into effect through Government actions.

  • Currently there are no objectives enabled by regulations referring to soils for the SIFD.

IV. Grandparented Designations & Objectives:

Existing objectives established under the Forest Practices Code (FPC) will be grandparented to FRPA as objectives enabled by regulations:

    • There are no grandparented designations and objectives referring to soils for the SIFD.

V. Practice Requirements:

If a person chooses to conform to the requirements of Sec. 35, (FPPR) and Sec. 36, (FPPR) of the FPPR, the person does not have to include results and strategies for the objective set out in Sec. 5, (FRPA).

These default results and strategies include:

Sec. 35 (1) (FPPR) Soil disturbance limits In this section:

"roadside work area" means the area adjacent to a road where one or both of the following are carried out:

(a) decking, processing or loading timber;

(b) piling or disposing of logging debris;

"sensitive soils" means soils that, because of their slope gradient, texture class, moisture regime, or organic matter content have the following risk of displacement, surface erosion or compaction:

(a) for the Interior, a very high hazard;

(b) for the Coast, a high or very high hazard.

(3) An agreement holder other than a holder of a minor tenure who is carrying out timber harvesting must not cause the amount of soil disturbance on the net area to be reforested to exceed the following limits:

(a) if the standards unit is predominantly comprised of sensitive soils, 5% of the area covered by the standards unit, excluding any area covered by a roadside work area;

(b) if the standards unit not is not predominantly comprised of sensitive soils, 10% of the area covered by the standards unit, excluding any area covered by a roadside work area;

(c) 25% of the area covered by a roadside work area.

(4) An agreement holder may cause soil disturbance that exceeds the limits specified in subsection (3) if the holder

(a) is removing infected stumps or salvaging windthrow and the additional disturbance is the minimum necessary, or

(b) is constructing a temporary access structure and both of the following apply:

(i) the limit set out in subsection (3) (a) or (b), as applicable, is not exceeded by more than 5% of the area covered by the standards unit, excluding the area covered by a roadside work area;

(ii) before the regeneration date, a sufficient amount of the area within the standards unit is rehabilitated such that the agreement holder is in compliance with the limits set out in subsection (3).

(5) The minister may require an agreement holder to rehabilitate an area of compacted soil if all of the following apply:

(a) the area of compacted soil

(i) was created by activities of the holder,

(ii) is within the net area to be reforested, and

(iii) is a minimum of 1 ha in size;

(b) the holder has not exceeded the limits described in subsection (3);

(c) rehabilitation would, in the opinion of the minister,

(i) materially improve the productivity and the hydrologic function of the soil within the area, and

(ii) not create an unacceptable risk of further damage or harm to, or impairment of, forest resource values related to one or more of the subjects listed in section 149 (1) of the Act.

(6) An agreement holder who rehabilitates an area under subsection (4) or (5) must

(a) remove or redistribute woody materials that are exposed on the surface of the area and are concentrating subsurface moisture, to the extent necessary to limit the concentration of subsurface moisture on the area,

(b) de-compact compacted soils, and

(c) return displaced surface soils, retrievable side-cast and berm materials.

(7) If an agreement holder rehabilitates an area under subsection (4) or (5) and erosion of exposed soil from the area would cause sediment to enter a stream, wetland or lake, or a material adverse effect in relation to one or more of the subjects listed in section 149 (1) of the Act, the agreement holder, unless placing debris or revegetation would not materially reduce the likelihood of erosion, must

(a) place woody debris on the exposed soils, or

(b) revegetate the exposed mineral soils.

Sec. 36, (FPPR) Permanent access structure limits

(1) An agreement holder must ensure that the area in a cutblock that is occupied by permanent access structures built by the holder or used by the holder does not exceed 7% of the cutblock, unless

(a) there is no other practicable option on that cutblock, having regard to

(i) the size, topography and engineering constraints of the cutblock,

(ii) in the case of a road, the safety of road users, or

(iii) the requirement in selection harvesting systems for excavated or bladed trails or other logging trails, or

(b) additional permanent access structures are necessary to provide access beyond the cutblock.

(2) If an agreement holder exceeds the limit for permanent access structures described in subsection (1) for either of the reasons set out in that subsection, the holder must ensure that the limit is exceeded as little as practicable.

(3) An agreement holder may rehabilitate an area occupied by permanent access structures in accordance with the results or strategies specified in the forest stewardship plan or by

(a) removing or redistributing woody materials that are exposed on the surface of the area and are concentrating subsurface moisture, as necessary to limit the concentration of subsurface moisture on the area,

(b) de-compacting compacted soils, and

(c) returning displaced surface soils, retrievable side-cast and berm materials.

(4) If an agreement holder rehabilitates an area under subsection (3) (a) and erosion of exposed soil from the area would cause sediment to enter a stream, wetland or lake, or a material adverse effect in relation to one or more of the subjects listed in section 149 (1) of the Act, the agreement holder, unless placing debris or revegetation would not materially reduce the likelihood of erosion, must

(a) place woody debris on the exposed soils, or

(b) revegetate the exposed mineral soils.

VI. Factors to Consider in Developing Results & Strategies:

Sec. 12, (FPPR): "(1) A person who prepares a forest stewardship plan under section 5 (1) (b) of the Act, may consider the factors set out in Schedule 1 when specifying results or strategies for established objectives." (Feb. 24, 2005)

Factors in regulations outlined in Schedule 1 - (FPPR) to consider in developing results and strategies for soils include the:

"(1). The following factors apply to a result or strategy for the objective set out in section 5 [objectives set by government for soils] of the regulation:

(a) the amount of productive forest land base that will be occupied by permanent access structures;

(b) the amount of soil disturbance within the net area to be reforested, having regard to

(i) the classification of soils based on their biological, physical and chemical properties, including their sensitivity to displacement, surface erosion and compaction,

(ii) the kinds of disturbance that are detrimental to productivity and hydrological function,

(iii) the amount of detrimental disturbance that can occur without unduly compromising productivity or hydrological function, and

(iv) the extent to which rehabilitation efforts can mitigate the effects of detrimental disturbance."

Additional Practice Requirements in FPPR for soils are:

Sec. 37 (FPPR), Landslides

"An authorized person who carries out a primary forest activity must ensure that the primary forest activity does not cause a landslide that has a material adverse effect in relation to one or more of the subjects listed in section 149 (1) of the Act."

Sec. 38 (FPPR), Gully processes

"An authorized person who carries out a primary forest activity on the Coast must ensure that the primary forest activity does not cause a gully process that has a material adverse effect in relation to one or more of the subjects listed in section 149 (1) of the Act."

Sec. 39 (FPPR), Natural surface drainage patterns

"(1) If an authorized person constructs a temporary access structure or a permanent access structure on an area, the person must maintain natural surface drainage patterns on the area both during and after construction.

(2) Despite subsection (1), if it is not practicable for an authorized person to maintain natural surface drainage patterns during the construction of a temporary access structure or permanent access structure, the person must ensure the altered surface drainage pattern is compatible with the original natural surface drainage pattern by the earlier of

(a) the end of the construction, and

(b) the next freshet."

Sec. 40 (FPPR), Revegetation

"An authorized person who constructs or deactivates a road must ensure that soil exposed by the construction or deactivation is revegetated within two years after the construction or deactivation is completed if it is reasonably foreseeable that

(a) the erosion of the soil would cause

(i) sediment to enter a stream, wetland or lake, or

(ii) a material adverse effect on a matter referred to in section 149 (1) [objectives set by government] of the Act, and

(b) revegetation would materially reduce the likelihood of erosion."

 

VII. Exemptions: There are conditional exemption exceptions (Dec. 13, 2004) to the practice requirements in regulation for soils.

Provisions for altering results and strategies are under:

  • Sec.12.1 (1) (FPPR) Exemptions - when undertaking given for compliance with specified regulations:

"(1) A person required to prepare a forest stewardship plan is exempt from that plan from the requirement under section 5 of the Act that the plan specify intended results or strategies in relation to the objective for soils set out in section 5 of this regulation if the person

(a) prepares the plan, including in it an undertaking that the person will comply with sections 35 and 36 of this regulation, during the term of the plan, and

(b) receives the minister's approval to the plan."

Sec. 12.2 (1) (FPPR) Conditional exemption - section 35 or 36

(1) A person required to prepare a forest stewardship plan is exempt from section 35 if the person

(a) prepares and submits to the minister the proposed plan, including an intended result or strategy for the objective for soils that is set out in section 5, in relation to the areas of primary forest activity under the plan, and

(b) receives the minister's approval to the plan.

(2) A person required to prepare a forest stewardship plan is exempt from section 36 if the person

(a) prepares and submits to the minister the proposed plan, including an intended result or strategy for the objective for soils that is set out in section 5, in relation to the areas of primary forest activity under the plan, and

(b) receives the minister's approval to the plan."

Cumulative Impact: When establishing objectives, the appropriate Minister, or delegate must consider the impact of the proposed objective on the provincial timber supply and cumulative impact on rights granted to timber, woodlot or range agreement holders.

Sec. 19, (FPPR) Division 2.1. Cumulative effect of multiple forest stewardship plans

For the purpose of section 9 [proportional objectives] of the Act, the minister may establish targets referred to in that section, if, where there are likely to be multiple forest stewardship plans within an area,

(a) one or more agreement holders may be unduly constrained in the specifying of results or strategies in the holder's plan unless targets are established under section 9 of the Act,

(b) the agreement holders within the area are unable to reach an agreement that would remove the constraints referred to in paragraph (a),

(c) an agreement holder subject to a constraint referred to in paragraph (a) requests the minister to act under section 9 of the Act, and

(d) the minister is satisfied that a fair and effective order can be made under this section."

New Objectives: Once a new objective has been in place for at least four months:

  • New operational plans must contain results and strategies to address the new objective if applicable to the area under the plan
  • Existing operational plans must be amended to address the new objective if applicable to the area under the plan
  • The government can reduce this four month period for some objectives.

Soils Related Resources:


FRPA RESOURCE EVALUATION Program:

Soil Conservation and Evaluation Links:

Resource Values Indicators Site:


Other FRPA values: select form the list below:

  1. Soils
  2. Timber including Forest Health
  3. Wildlife
  4. Fish
  5. Water
  6. Biodiversity
  7. Cultural Heritage Resources
  8. Resource Features
  9. Recreation Resources
  10. Visual Quality
  11. Forage and Associated Plant Communities

Disclaimer: Please note that the government is under no obligation to develop or provide the objectives matrix to FRPA stakeholders. The matrix was developed to assist those who prepare operational plan with identifying objectives for which results and strategies must be developed within operational plans. The Ministry of Forests does not make any guarantees with respect to the accuracy, currency and reliability of the information contained within this objectives matrix.

It is the plan proponent's responsibility to ensure that all legal requirements are met.

The legislation extracts quoted in the text of this website are for the users convenience only and they do not have legal status.
For the official legal text, please refer to the Queens Printer legal publications.

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