Sheep Vegetation Management Guidelines

Glossary

Brushing: a silviculture activity using chemical, manual, grazing or mechanical means to control competing forest vegetation and reduce competition for space, light, moisture, and nutrients with crop trees or seedlings.

Buffer zone: where the Regional Director of the MELP, in consultation with the MAF, has determined that the transmission of infectious organisms is an issue, a buffer zone to prevent physical contact between wild species and domestic sheep used for vegetation management must be established. The size of the buffer zone should be based on the MELP's assessment of site-specific conditions.

Carnivore: a grizzly bear, black bear, bobcat, lynx, cougar, wolf, coyote, wolverine, and bald or golden eagle.

Competing vegetation: vegetation that competes for the limited common resources (space, light, water, and nutrients) of a forest site needed by future crop trees for survival and acceptable growth.

Conservation Officer: an employee of the MELP who has the powers and authority of a peace officer.

Contract Officer: the person who is assigned by the contracting agency (Ministry of Forests, or the Forest Company - Licensee) to administer the contract on that agency's behalf. The Contract Officer may be required to carry out pre-contract activities as delegated by the Spending Authority, and is responsible for the day-to-day execution and completion of the contract.

Contractor: any company or individual which/who has agreed to provide works/services (generally to the forest licensee or the District Manager) under the terms and conditions of Ministry contract.

Crop tree: a tree in a young stand or plantation selected to be carried through to an interim or final harvest.

Designated MELP official: a person designated by the MELP to implement the Forest Practices Code of British Columbia Act and Regulations.

Forage: grasses, herbs and small shrubs that can be used as feed for livestock or wildlife.

Forest Practices Code: Legislation (including the Forest Practices Code of British Columbia Act and associated Regulations), Standards and Field Guides that govern forest practices in British Columbia.

Grazing: livestock grazing can be used to prepare a harvested site for reforestation, or as a means of controlling competing vegetation after new seedlings have been established. It involves controlling domestic livestock (e.g., sheep, and cattle) to consume or recycle large volumes of vegetation.

Habitat: the place where an organism lives and/or the conditions of that environment including the soil, vegetation, water and food.

Higher-level plan: means an objective

  1. For a resource management zone,
  2. For a landscape unit or sensitive area,
  3. For a recreation site (1), recreation trail (2) or interpretive forest site (3).

Operational plan: means a forest development plan, logging plan, range use plan, silviculture prescription and stand management prescription.

Operational Planning Regulation: sets out detailed public notice, review, approval, and amendment obligations; and lays out requirements regarding scope, content, and development requirements for each of the operational plans.

Proponent: a person who is required to establish a free growing stand on an area under a prescription or under another form of authorization. The proponent is generally the forest licensee or the District Manager.

Range Use Plan: is an operational plan that must include, for the area under the plan, a description of grazing and hay cutting activities that will be carried out and range development activities that will be constructed or carried out on the area. It must also include matters required by regulation and be consistent with any higher level plan.

Riparian area: means an area of land that

  1. is adjacent to a stream, river, lake or wetland, and
  2. contains vegetation that, due to the presence of water, is distinctly different from the vegetation of adjacent upland areas.

Riparian management area (RMA): as defined by the FPC, means an area of a width determined in accordance with Part 8 of the FPC Operational Planning Regulation that

  1. is adjacent to a stream or a wetland or a lake with a riparian class of L2, L3 or L4, and
  2. consists of a riparian management zone and, depending on the riparian class of the stream, wetland or lake, a riparian reserve zone.

Riparian management zone (RMZ): as defined by the FPC, means that portion of the riparian management area that is outside of any riparian reserve zone or if there is not a riparian reserve zone, that area located adjacent to a stream, wetland or lake of a width determined in accordance with Part 8 of the FPC Operational Planning Regulation.

Riparian reserve zone (RRZ): as defined by the FPC, means that portion, if any, of the riparian management area or lakeshore management area located adjacent to a stream, wetland or lake of a width determined in accordance with Part 8 of the FPC Operational Planning Regulation.

Sheep Health Protocol: requirements developed for the health management and inspection of sheep used for vegetation management. The protocol is intended to maximize the health of sheep and minimize the risks of disease to participating flocks and wildlife, predation, and welfare concerns.

Silviculture Prescription: A document that collects site-specific field data and establishes site-specific management objectives and standards for producing a free-growing stand. A Silviculture Prescription is a legal requirement as per Sections 22 and 23 of the Forest Practices Code of British Columbia Act. The content requirements are specified in the Operational Planning Regulation.

Soil compaction: is the compression of soil.

Special Use Permit: is used to authorize the temporary use of Crown land within a provincial forest for forest practices. Special Use Permits are issued for terms ranging from 1 to 5 years. The term of the permit is determined by the local Resource Officer, under the authority of the district manager. There may or may not be a fee attached to it.

Temporary Grazing Permit: is used to authorize the use of Crown land within a provincial forest for livestock grazing. The permit may be issued, by the district manager, for a term of no longer than one year. The requirements of a temporary grazing permit are set out in the Range Act and the Forest Practices Code of British Columbia Act.

Vegetation management: is the necessary control of vegetation that could compete with and hinder the establishment and growth of crop seedlings.


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