Forest Investment Account (FIA) - Land Base Investment Program - Innovative
FIA Project 6355002

    5-year summary of summer bird surveys on Vancouver Island, the Sunshine Coast, and Queen Charlotte Islands
 
Project lead: Weyerhaeuser Company Ltd.
Contributing Authors: Preston, Michael I.; Campbell, R. Wayne
Imprint: Nanaimo, B.C. : Weyerhaeuser Company Ltd., 2005
Subject: Forest Investment Account (FIA), Birds, British Columbia
Series: Forest Investment Account (FIA) - Land Base Investment Program - Innovative
Description:
This report reviews the history of Summer Bird Surveys on Vancouver Island (2000 to 2004), the Sunshine Coast (2001 to 2004), and the Queen Charlotte Islands (20001 to 2004). Investigative transects and methodologies were established in 1999, and were applied consistently from 2000 to 2004 in the respective regions. Thus far, Summer Bird Surveys include: 1) 28 permanent routes (each with 50 survey stations) on Vancouver Island (23 with 5 continuous survey years and 5 with 4 continuous survey years); 2) 16 permanent routes (each with 25 survey stations) on the Sunshine Coast (including Texada Island) with 4 continuous survey years; 3) 6 permanent routes (each with 50 survey stations) on the Queen Charlotte Islands with 4 continuous survey years; 4) 1,150 survey stations sampled on Vancouver Island from 2000 to 2004; 5) 400 survey stations sampled on the Sunshine Coast from 2001 to 2004; and 6) 300 survey stations sampled on the Queen Charlotte Islands from 2001 to 2004. On the Queen Charlotte Islands 10,600 observations of 54 species were observed. Of these, 35 species occurred in all survey years (2001 to 2004). Preliminary trends are provided for 15 species that occurred regularly in most years and on most transects. Among these species, 5 are showing an increase over time, 3 are showing a decrease over time, and 7 appear relatively stable over time. On the Sunshine Coast 13,416 observations of 99 species were observed. Of these, 59 species occurred in all survey years (2001 to 2004). Preliminary trends are provided for 14 species that have occurred in most years and on most transects. Among these species, 6 are showing an increase over time, 1 is showing a decrease over time, and 7 appear relatively stable over time. On Vancouver Island 31,515 observations of 101 species were observed. Of these, 66 species occurred in all survey years (2000 to 2004). Preliminary trends are provided for 20 species that have occurred in most years and on most of the 23 transects. Among these species, 3 are showing an increase with time, none are showing a decrease over time, and 17 appear relatively stable over time. For all years considered in each region, measures of species richness, abundance, and diversity from this study were not consistent with published North American Breeding Bird Survey data for the period 1965-1979. In each of the three regions sampled in this study, species richness and abundance were consistently lower than historical results. Species diversity, however, was consistently higher in this study. The discrepancies in these parameter estimates with historical values is most likely attributed to transect location: from 1965-1979, transects were mainly in urban and rural areas, while transects from this study were more forest-based. Variation among parameter estimates from this study are most likely attributable to variation in habitat quality and availability within and among transects, although we have not tested this specifically. Also, as is evident from plots of these parameters for the Queen Charlotte Islands, interannual variation is most likely attributed to climatic variation, as well as overwinter survival and recruitment. We consider coverage of Vancouver Island, the Sunshine Coast, and the Queen Charlotte Islands to be sufficient for the most prevalent habitats and bird species. Two new transects were established and GPS'd in TFL 39 on Vancouver Island in 2004 to increase power of habitat model analysis. However, we note some deficiencies in coverage and data for some areas: 1) New transects are recommended for central, south-eastern, and south-western Vancouver Island, since habitats in those areas are under-represented; 2) On the Queen Charlotte Islands, new routes on Moresby Island and Graham Island are recommended, both to increase sampling of the kinds of habitats available, and to increase power for trend and habitat analyses; 3) Transects on the Sunshine Coast and Queen Charlotte Islands are still lacking GPS data, which will be important for relating observations with forest cover data and making better use of available information.
prepared by M.I. Preston and R. W. Campbell

    Deliverables:

Progress Report (0.6Mb)

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Updated August 16, 2010 

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